Art in its creative form is a stress buster, and visiting a fine art gallery is similar to exposing the mind to interesting and colorful ideas.
When we talk of fine art, translated from French term "beaux arts" in 1767, we refer to an elitist art form, concerned with subtlety and traditions. Fine art includes in its repertoire a gamut of visual art forms that include painting, sculpture, craftwork, applied arts in all its avatars, theater, photography, opera, poetry recitations, or etchings and drawings. The fine art galleries, continuing with the tradition of their brand name, are not mere rooms or galleries that house paintings but are metamorphosing into places of recreation where visitors stroll in, admire or dissect art, enjoy wine, or meet with fellow artists and critics.   Compared with online art galleries, the fine art galleries have to rely on customer loyalty for continuance. Newer clientele is always in short supply, and galleries are looking at unique ways to add to their cultural quotient along with economic benefits. Most fine art galleries are supported by high-profile professionals or business people who, in turn, support charities. By participating in or partnering with charities, the art galleries gain the customer loyalty of existing and new patrons. Another advantage for both the charity organizer and gallery owner is new mailing lists and footfalls, even if paintings and works of art do not fetch the anticipated amounts.
    Another novel method of getting in discerning crowds is arranging art walks, tours, an open studio, meet-the-artist programs, or gallery events, or to tie up with neighboring or sister galleries to familiarize visitors with fine or elitist art forms as well as popularize the gallery.
Sometimes, to focus attention on an ongoing exhibition theme, artists themselves organize live music shows, theater or dance shows, art auctions or appearances by signing their artwork. These activities have helped fine art galleries to broaden their customer bases and still maintain exclusivity.
Through my art I am encouraging the viewer to feel something about the object they are viewing, whether it be recognition, familiarity, curiosity, empathy, happiness or horror.
Added 2010/07/26 | Updated 2011/03/08
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Founded in 1879 as both a museum and school, first stood on the southwest corner of State and Monroe Streets. It opened on its present site at Michigan Avenue and Adams Street in 1893.
Added 2010/01/21 | Updated 2011/11/16
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